BOH4M

Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals, Grade 12, University/College Preparation

Course Code:   BOH4M

Course Title: Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals, Grade 12, University/College Preparation

Department: Business

Course Developer(s): Wilson Li

Development Date: April, 2018

Revision Number: 0

Revision Date: May 20, 2019

Ministry Document: Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2006

Credit value: 1.0

Credit Hours: 110

Prerequisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Textbook(s): Management Fundamentals, John Wiley & Sons (2009)

Course Code:   BOH4M

Course Title: Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals, Grade 12, University/College Preparation

Department: Business

Course Developer(s): Wilson Li

Development Date: April, 2018

Revision Number: 0

Revision Date: May 20, 2019

Ministry Document: Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2006

Credit value: 1.0

Credit Hours: 110

Prerequisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Textbook(s): Management Fundamentals, John Wiley & Sons (2009)

Course Code:   BOH4M

Course Title: Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals, Grade 12, University/College Preparation

Department: Business

Course Developer(s): Wilson Li

Development Date: April, 2018

Revision Number: 0

Revision Date: May 20, 2019

Ministry Document: Business Studies, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2006

Credit value: 1.0

Credit Hours: 110

Prerequisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Textbook(s): Management Fundamentals, John Wiley & Sons (2009)

 

Contents Length
Unit 1 Foundations of Management & Ethics

  • Challenges of the workplace.
  • Levels of management.
  • Types of managers.
  • Management process.
  • Ethical behaviour and social responsibility.
20 hours
Unit 2    Leading in Management 

  • Entrepreneurship and small businesses.
  • Environment, organizational structure and diversity.
  • Motivation
15 hours
Unit 3   Management Challenges

  • Organizational structures.
  • Changes in the workplace.
  • Individual behaviour and performance.
  • Stress and conflict management.
  • Global dimensions of management.
25 hours
Unit 4    Organization in Management

  • Organizational structures.
  • Human resources management.
  • Changes in the workplace.
  • Human resources management.
20 hours
Column 1 Value 5 20 hours
Unit 5    Planning and Controlling 

  • Teams and teamwork.
  • Communication and interpersonal skills.
  • Planning and controlling.
  • Strategic management.
8 hours
Final Examination 2 hours
Total 110 hours
  Assessment for Learning Assessment as Learning Assessment of Learning
Student Product
  • Journals/Letters/Emails (checklist)
  • Entrance Ticket
  • Exit Tickets
  • Journals/Letters/Emails (checklist)
  • Assignments
  • Rough Drafts (rubric)
  • Research Paper (rubric)
  • Quizzes (Scale/Rubric)
  • Posters (Scale/Rubric)
  • Vocabulary notebooks (anecdotal)
  • Essays (rubric)
  • Peer Feed Back (anecdotal/checklist)
  • Journals/Letters/Emails (checklist)
  • Assignments
  • Research Paper (rubric)
  • Tests (Rubric)
  • Posters (Rubric)
  • Portfolio/ISU (Rubric)
  • Essays (rubric)
  • Exam
Observation
  • Class Discussion (anecdotal)
  • Self-Proof reading (checklist)
  • Class Presentations (anecdotal)
  • Performance Task (anecdotal/scale)
  • PowerPoint Presentations (rubric)
  • Debate (rubric)
  • PowerPoint Presentations (rubric)
  • Performance Task (anecdotal/scale)
Conversation
  • Student teacher conference (checklist)
  • Group Discussion (checklist)
  • Pair work (checklist)
  • Debates/Opinion (rubric)
  • Peer Feed Back (anecdotal)
  • Peer editing (anecdotal)
  • Oral Quizzes/Tests (Scale/Rubric)
  • Student teacher conference (checklist)
  • Question Answer session (checklist)
  • Oral Tests (Scale/Rubric)
  • Debate (rubric)

 

Assessment and Evaluation of Student Performance

●Learning Skills:

Responsibility, Organizational, Independent Work, Collaboration, Initiative, Self-Regulation

●Assessment of Learning Skills:

In-class observations, self-evaluations, homework and assignment checklists, participation rubrics

●Achievement Categories:

Knowledge and Understanding, Thinking, Communication, Application

●Assessment and Evaluation of Achievement Categories:

Checklists, Class Discussions, Presentations, Homework Checks, Individual Projects, Peer Evaluation, Quizzes, Rubrics, Teacher Observation, Written Tests

Assessment Weight Final Grade Weight Levels of Achievement
Column 1 Value 25% Column 3 Value Column 4 Value Level D: 50 – 59%
Column 1 Value 2 25% Column 3 Value 2 Column 4 Value 2 Level C: 60 – 69%
Column 1 Value 3 25% Column 3 Value 3 Column 4 Value 3 Level B: 70 – 79%
Column 1 Value 4 25% Column 3 Value 4 Column 4 Value 4 Level A: 80 – 100%
Column 1 Value 5 Column 2 Value 5 Final Exam Column 4 Value 5 Column 5 Value 5

 

Program Planning Considerations

In planning courses in business studies, teachers should take into account the needs of exceptional students as set out in their Individual Education Plan. This course reflects the world of business studies, which offers a vast array of opportunities for exceptional students. Students who use alternative techniques for communication may find a venue for their talents in computer applications in business studies.

In this Introduction to Financial Accounting course, information technology is considered a learning tool that must be accessed by the students in many areas. As a result, students will develop transferable skills through their experience with word processing, spreadsheets, journals, flow charts, and telecommunication, as would be expected in an accounting environment. Information grated into the business studies curriculum in a way that mirrors the dynamic environment in and communication technologies are environment in which business is conducted today, creating an authentic and relevant learning environment for students.

All of our Business studies can provide a wide range of options to address the needs of ESL/ELD students. Since business seeks ways to address the needs of diverse markets and communities, students can apply their own experiences and backgrounds to analyze various markets’ needs and business strategies. In addition, since businesses require employees with a wide range of skills and abilities, many students will learn how their backgrounds and language skills can contribute to business success.

Antidiscrimination education promotes a school climate and classroom practice that encourage all students to work to high standards, ensure that they are given a variety of opportunities to be successful, affirm their self-worth, and help them strengthen their sense of identity and positive self-image. The business studies curriculum is designed to help students acquire the habits of mind that are essential in a complex democratic society characterized by rapid technological, economic, political, and social change. These include respect and understanding with regard to individuals, groups, and cultures in Canada and the global community, including an appreciation and valuing of the contributions of Aboriginal people to the richness and diversity of’ Canadian life. They also involve respect and responsibility for the environment and an understanding of the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of citizenship. Learning the importance of protecting human right sand of taking a stand against racism and other expressions of hatred and discrimination is also part of the foundation for responsible citizenship and ethical business practice. In business studies, students will learn about the changing workplace and the Canadian and global economy. They will learn how business is carried out effectively and equitably in the local and global workplace and how it is affected and enhanced by the diversity of the global marketplace. Learning activities in business studies courses should be inclusive in nature, reflecting diverse points of view and experiences. They should enable students to become more sensitive to the experiences and perceptions of others, to value and show respect for diversity in the school and in the wider society, and to make responsible and equitable decisions in their personal and business relationships. The critical thinking and research skills acquired in business studies courses will enable students to recognize bias and stereotyping in text and images, as well as discriminatory attitudes that create barriers to productive relationships in business and trade.

Success in all their secondary school courses depends in large part on students’ literacy skills. The activities and tasks that students undertake in the business studies curriculum involve oral, written, and visual communication skills, Communicating in a business environment and using business software require the use and understanding of specialized terminology. In all business studies courses, students are required to use appropriate and correct terminology, and are encouraged to use language with care and precision, in order to communicate effectively.’ The business studies curriculum also builds on and reinforces certain aspects of the mathematics curriculum. Students need to learn how to locate relevant information in a variety of print and electronic sources, including books and articles, manuals, newspapers, websites, databases, tables, diagrams, and charts.

The course curriculum is developed to help students acquire the habits and perspectives essential for a complex, diverse society where change and implementing new ways and methods is a norm. These include respect, understanding and behaviors towards individuals, groups and cultures within Canada, including the Aboriginal people, as well as the extension of this same respect, understanding and behavior towards cultures and countries on a global scale.

By applying the skills they have developed, students will readily connect their classroom learning to real-life activities in the world of business and public service. Cooperative education and other workplace experiences will broaden their knowledge of employment opportunities in a wide range of fields, including small-business operations, corporate management and operations, marketing, accounting, and government service. In addition, students will increase their understanding of workplace practices and the nature of the employer-employee relationship.

The business studies program provides for exploration of a variety of concepts relating to health and safety in the workplace. In planning learning activities to help students achieve the curriculum expectations, teachers need to ensure that students have opportunities to consider health, safety, and security issues. Health and safety issues must be addressed when learning involves cooperative education and other workplace experiences.