ENG3U

 

English, Grade 11, University Preparation

Course Code:   ENG3U

Course Title: English, Grade 11, University

Department: English

Course Developer(s): Saman Moustafa

Course Modification: Benny Sanders

Development Date: April, 2018

Revision Number: 1

Revision Date: August, 2019

Ministry Document: English, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007

Credit value: 1.0

Credit Hours: 110

Prerequisite(s): ENG2D – English, Grade 10, Academic

Co-requisite(s): None

Textbook(s): Elements of English; Harcourt; The Kite Runner; Khaled Hosseini; Othello; Shakespeare William

Media: Lion      Garth Davis

*Additional poems, essays, and short stories will be selected by the teacher.*

 

Course Code:   ENG3U

Course Title: English, Grade 11, University

Department: English

Course Developer(s): Saman Moustafa

Course Modification: Benny Sanders

Development Date: April, 2018

Revision Number: 1

Revision Date: August, 2019

Ministry Document: English, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007

Credit value: 1.0

Credit Hours: 110

Prerequisite(s): ENG2D – English, Grade 10, Academic

Co-requisite(s): None

Textbook(s): Elements of English; Harcourt; The Kite Runner; Khaled Hosseini; Othello; Shakespeare William

Media: Lion      Garth Davis

*Additional poems, essays, and short stories will be selected by the teacher.*

 

Course Code:   ENG3U

Course Title: English, Grade 11, University

Department: English

Course Developer(s): Saman Moustafa

Course Modification: Benny Sanders

Development Date: April, 2018

Revision Number: 1

Revision Date: August, 2019

Ministry Document: English, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007

Credit value: 1.0

Credit Hours: 110

Prerequisite(s): ENG2D – English, Grade 10, Academic

Co-requisite(s): None

Textbook(s): Elements of English; Harcourt; The Kite Runner; Khaled Hosseini; Othello; Shakespeare William

Media: Lion      Garth Davis

*Additional poems, essays, and short stories will be selected by the teacher.*

 

Course Content

 

Time Allocated

Unit 1 The Art of Essay Writing                                 

  • Identifying types of essay
  • Diction & grammar
  • Essay structure and organization
  • Cause and effect essay project

 

 

20 hours

 

Unit 2    Short Story and Literary Lenses                             

  • Short story exploration
  • Critical literary lenses  acquisition

 

20 hours

 

Unit 3    Novel Study The Kite Runner

  • Study of Khaled Hosseini’s Kite Runner and exploration of culture, power, and trauma
  • Text to text comparison with movie: Lion

 

20 hours

 

Unit 4 Drama  Othello               

  • Exploration of Shakespeare’s famous text
  • Will analyze and interpret themes of: jealousy, prejudice, and revenge

 

20 hours

 

Unit 5    Novel Study  The Handmaid’s Tale

  • Study of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale
  • Will explore themes of sexism , oppression, censorship, and control

 

20 hours

 

Unit 6     Culminating Activity                

● Independent novel project

 

8 hours
Final Examination     2 hours
   Total: 110 hours

Term Summative Evaluations (70% Term Work)

  • Through the course work students will demonstrate mastery of all the overall expectations of the course.
  • Students’ marks will be affected by any missing, late or incomplete assignments, as per QIC Late Policy. Prior to assessment and evaluation, ample opportunities to enhance skills relating to achievement of the curriculum expectations will be provided to students.
  • Major evaluations will be announced at least one week in advance.
  • In the event that a student needs to miss a scheduled evaluation due to acceptable reasons, as listed in .Policy, students must notify teachers in advance to re-schedule evaluation. In the case of unexpected absence a note must be present, signed by a parent or guardian, immediately upon their return to explain the absence.
  • Cheating is strictly unacceptable and will be dealt with accordingly.

30% Summative Evaluation

A final exam will be administrated during the exam time period and a performance task evaluation will be conducted during the final four weeks of the course.

The Final Grade

  • The grade appearing on the final report card will be the weighted sum of term work and final exam marks.

 

Final Mark Calculation

The assessment evaluation of students in this course is in accordance with the Ministry curriculum guidelines.

Assessment Weight Final grade Weight Levels of Achievement
Knowledge and Understanding 25% Term Work 70% Level D: 50 – 59%
Applications 25% Level C: 60 – 69%
Thinking and Inquiry 25% Final Exam 15% Level B: 70 – 79%
Communication 25% Culminating Performance Task 15% Level A: 80 – 100%

This course is based on the premise that all students can be successful language learners. They can be successful learners because of the quality of the teaching in the course. Our teachers clarify the purpose for the learning, activate prior knowledge, and differentiate the instruction for individual students. The teacher will provide the opportunity for the student to practice and apply their knowledge and skills. The teacher will introduce a wide variety of activities to integrate the expectations from the different strands and will provide for the explicit teaching of knowledge and skills.

In planning courses in English, teachers should take into account the needs of exceptional students as set out in their Individual Education Plan. English courses reflect the creative part of our literary world, which offers a vast array of opportunities for exceptional students. Students who use alternative techniques for communication may find a venue for their talents as writers. Just as English responds to the needs and demands of the greater world of work, English courses are largely shaped by the needs and demands of students who will all eventually end up in this greater world. Each student has their own unique patterns of learning and all can meet with success.

With exposure to the English language in a supportive learning environment, most young children will develop oral fluency quite quickly, making connections between concepts and skills acquired in their first language and similar concepts and skills presented in English. However, oral fluency is not a good indicator of a student’s knowledge of vocabulary or sentence structure, reading comprehension, or other aspects of language proficiency that play an important role in literacy development and academic success. Research has shown that it takes five to seven years for most English language learners to catch up to their English-speaking peers in their ability to use English for academic purposes. Moreover, the older the children are when they arrive, the greater the language knowledge and skills that they have to catch up on, and the more direct support they require from their teachers. Responsibility for students’ English-language development is shared by the course teacher, the ESL/ELD teacher (where available), and other school staff. Volunteers and peers may also be helpful in supporting English language learners in the language classroom.

Literacy, mathematical literacy, and inquiry/research skills are critical to students’ success in all subjects of the curriculum and in all areas of their lives. The acquisition and development of literacy skills is clearly the focus of the English curriculum, but the English program also builds on, reinforces, and enhances mathematical literacy. In English courses, students are encouraged to develop their ability to ask questions and to explore a variety of possible answers to those questions. As they advance through the grades, they acquire the skills to locate relevant information from a variety of sources, such as books, newspapers, dictionaries, encyclopedias, interviews, videos, and the Internet. The questioning they practiced in the early grades becomes more sophisticated as they learn that all sources of information have a particular point of view and that the recipient of the information has a responsibility to evaluate it, determine its validity and relevance, and use it in appropriate ways. The ability to locate, question, and validate information allows a student to become an independent, lifelong learner.

Teachers planning English programs are aware of the purpose and benefits of the Ontario Skills Passport (OSP). The OSP is a bilingual, web-based resource that enhances the relevance of classroom learning for students and strengthens school-work connections. The OSP provides clear descriptions of Essential Skills such as Reading Text, Writing, Computer Use, Measurement and Calculation, and Problem Solving and includes an extensive database of occupation-specific workplace tasks that illustrate how workers use these skills on the job. The Essential Skills are transferable, in that they are used in virtually all occupations. For further information on the OSP and the Essential Skills, visit Ontario Skills Passport.

Expectations in the English program include many opportunities for students to apply their language skills to work- related situations, to explore educational and career options, and to become self-directed learners. To prepare students for the literacy demands of a wide array of postsecondary educational programs and careers, English courses require students to develop research skills, practise expository writing, and learn strategies for understanding informational reading materials. Making oral presentations and working in small groups with classmates help students express themselves confidently and work cooperatively with others. Regardless of their postsecondary destination, all students need to realize that literacy skills are employability skills. Powerful literacy skills will equip students to manage information technologies, communicate effectively and correctly in a variety of situations, and perform a variety of tasks required in most work environments.

Cooperative Education and other Forms of Experiential Learning. By applying the skills they have developed, students will readily connect their classroom learning to real-life activities in the world in which they live.

The English program provides the reading skills for the student to be able to explore the variety of concepts relating to health and safety in the workplace.