MHF4U

Advanced Functions, Grade 12, University Preparation

School: Elite High School

Department: Mathematics

Course Developer:Dianna Jiang

Course Development Date: June 2017

Revision Date:

Revised by:

Course Title:Advanced Functions

Course Type:University Preparation

Ministry Course Code: MHF4U

Credit Value:1.0

Secondary Policy DocumentThe Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, Mathematics, 2007(revised)

Prerequisite(s) and corequisite(s):  MCR3U

School: Elite High School

Department: Mathematics

Course Developer:Dianna Jiang

Course Development Date: June 2017

Revision Date:

Revised by:

Course Title:Advanced Functions

Course Type:University Preparation

Ministry Course Code: MHF4U

Credit Value:1.0

Secondary Policy DocumentThe Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, Mathematics, 2007(revised)

Prerequisite(s) and corequisite(s):  MCR3U

School: Elite High School

Department: Mathematics

Course Developer:Dianna Jiang

Course Development Date: June 2017

Revision Date:

Revised by:

Course Title:Advanced Functions

Course Type:University Preparation

Ministry Course Code: MHF4U

Credit Value:1.0

Secondary Policy DocumentThe Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, Mathematics, 2007(revised)

Prerequisite(s) and corequisite(s):  MCR3U  

Units Length
Unit 1 Characteristics of functions 27.5 hours
Unit 2 Polynomial and rational functions 27.5 hours
Unit 3 Trigonometric functions 27.5 hours
Unit 4 Exponential and logarithmic functions 27.5 hours
Total Number of Instructional Hours 110 hours
  Column 2 Column 3 Column 4
Student Product
  • Journals/Letters/Emails (checklist)
  • Entrance Ticket
  • Exit Tickets
  • Journals/Letters/Emails (checklist)
  • Assignments
  • Rough Drafts (rubric)
  • Research Paper (rubric)
  • Quizzes (Scale/Rubric)
  • Posters (Scale/Rubric)
  • Vocabulary notebooks (anecdotal)
  • Essays (rubric)
  • Peer Feed Back (anecdotal/checklist)
  • Journals/Letters/Emails (checklist)
  • Assignments
  • Research Paper (rubric)
  • Tests (Scale/Rubric)
  • Posters (Scale/Rubric)
  • Portfolio/ISU (Scale/Rubric)
  • Essays (rubric)
  • Exam
Observation
  • Class Discussion (anecdotal)
  • Self-Proof reading (checklist)
  • Class Presentations (anecdotal)
  • Performance Task (anecdotal/scale)
  • PowerPoint Presentations (rubric)
  • Debate (rubric)
  • PowerPoint Presentations (rubric)
  • Performance Task (anecdotal/scale)
  • Debate (rubric)
Conversation
  • Student teacher conference (checklist)
  • Group Discussion (checklist)
  • Pair work (checklist)
  • Debates/Opinion (rubric)
  • Peer Feed Back (anecdotal)
  • Peer editing (anecdotal)
  • Oral Quizzes/Tests (Scale/Rubric)
  • Student teacher conference (checklist)
  • Question Answer session (checklist)
  • Oral Tests (Scale/Rubric)
  Percentage
Term Work 

  • For a description of the specific achievement requirements for each category listed, please see the achievement chart (taken from the Ontario Curriculum Document) for this course.
  • The grade will be established on evaluations conducted throughout this course.  K/U (20%); T/I (20%); C (15%); A (15%)
  • The term work will be calculated as follows:
    • Tests 50%
    • Assignments 20%
70%
Cumulative Activity(ies) 

  • The grade will be based on a culminating activity which may be formal a summative assignment or the grade will be based on a final exam. The percentage allotted to K/U, T/I, C, A may vary.
  • The cumulative activity will be as follows:
    • Final exam 30%
30%

Sample Terms:

K/U: Arrange, calculate, check, define, explain, organize, prioritize, recognize, record, write

T/I: Analyze, Appraise, conclude, experiment, inspect, investigate, predict, research

C: Articulate, challenge, clarify, compare, engage, express, justify, present, propose, reflect

A: Adapt, combine, connect, create, devise, evaluate, Integrate, invent, lead, modify, perform

Program Planning Consideration

In order to apply their knowledge effectively and to continue to learn, students must havea solid conceptual foundation in mathematics. Successful classroom practices engagestudents in activities that require higher-order thinking, with an emphasis on problemsolving. Learning experienced in the primary, junior, and intermediate divisions should

have provided students with a good grounding in the investigative approach to learningnew mathematical concepts, including inquiry models of problem solving, and thisapproach continues to be important in the senior mathematics program.

Literacy skills can play an important role in student success in mathematics courses. Many of the activities and tasks students undertake in mathematics courses involve the use of written, oral, and visual communication skills. For example, students use language to record their observations, to explain their reasoning when solving problems, to describe their inquiries in both informal and formal contexts, and to justify their results in small group conversations, oral presentations, and written reports. The language of mathematics

includes special terminology. The study of mathematics consequently encourages students to use language with greater care and precision and enhances their ability to communicate effectively.

Information and communication technologies (ICT) provide a range of tools that can significantly extend and enrich teachers’ instructional strategies and support students’learning in mathematics. Teachers can use ICT tools and resources both for whole-class instruction and to design programs that meet diverse student needs. Technology can help to reduce the time spent on routine mathematical tasks, allowing students to devote more of their efforts to thinking and concept development. Useful ICT tools include

simulations, multimedia resources, databases, sites that give access to large amounts of statistical data, and computer-assisted learning modules.

Applications such as databases, spreadsheets, dynamic geometry software, dynamic statistical software, graphing software, computer algebra systems (CAS), word-processing software, and presentation software can be used to support various methods of inquiry in mathematics. Technology also makes possible simulations of complex systems that can be useful for problem-solving purposes or when field studies on a particular topic are not feasible.

Since many of the students at Elite School are likely to have English as their second language, the following accommodations are anticipated:

  • Use of a variety of instructional strategies (e.g., extensive us of visual cues, scaffolding, manipulative, pictures, diagrams, graphic organizers; attention to clarity of instructions)
  • Modeling of preferred ways of working in mathematics; previewing of textbooks; pre-teaching of key vocabulary; peer tutoring; strategic use of students’ first languages
  • Use of a variety of learning resources (e.g., visual material, simplified text, bilingual dictionaries, materials that reflect cultural diversity)

Granting of extra time, simplification of language used in problems and instructions